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Stargazing

by | Nov 20, 2021 | 0 comments

Stars shine brilliantly in the heavens. Beneath them, five children lie huddled on the lawn under blankets. They gaze excitedly up at the many sparkling specks scattered over the great black dome of the sky. Heeding reports of a meteor shower, they are eager to see how many wonders meet their eyes tonight.


Suddenly the silence is broken by the first cry of— “Ohhhh, there’s one!”


“I saw a falling star! Way over there, down toward the west…”


“Whew, that was a bright one.” The comments fall thick and fast as heartbeats quicken with the excitement of each meteor.


“Shhh, children, we really must be more quiet,” comes a calm voice through the still night air. The chatter settles down to a low, excited hum.


“The Milky Way is really bright tonight, children. Do you see it?”


“That’s it right overhead, isn’t it?”


“Is it that cloudy-like stuff, or what?”


“This is such a pretty night.”


Another meteor sails over the vast sky. It explodes in a flash, causing the children to gasp in delight. The neighbor dogs begin sudden sharp barking, and faraway comes the call of a hoot owl. Several more meteors leave a trail, and the children keep their heads cranking in order to see all they can.


A lull comes in the shower, and the children start picking out some constellations. “That’s Cassiopeia, isn’t it?”
“There’s the Little Dipper—no, over there, I think.”


“There’s a little house-shape.”


“I see the Big Dipper.”


Someone exclaims, “Look at that big long meteor!” to cries of “Where? Where? Oh, I see it!”
The littlest one shivers. “Ooh, I’m cold,” whimpers a small voice.


“I think we need another blanket,” Big Sister agrees. “Who’s brave enough to go get one?”


No one wants to venture back through the dark, plus they might miss the thrilling streak of another meteor. So after much shuffling of the blankets, quiet descends once more upon the little party.


Finally, Big Sister asks for the flashlight and peers at her watch. “We have three more minutes,” she announces, to groans of, “Just a little longer…I hope I see one more yet!” How quickly the allowed half hour has passed. But since there is school the next day, little folks need their sleep!


As the happy group troop back to the house, blankets dragging on the cold ground, most necks are craned upward for one last glimpse…and then, back to their cozy beds.

Milky Way photo © Markus Gann/Dreamstime.com

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